A Weekly Recap and Looking Ahead (July 18): NPR

Relatives and friends attend Sunday’s funeral for Liza, a 4-year-old girl killed by the Russian attack on Vinnytsia, Ukraine. The girl was among 23 people killed in Thursday’s missile attack in Vinnytsia. His mother, Iryna Dmytrieva, was among dozens injured.

Efrem Lukatsky/AP


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Efrem Lukatsky/AP


Relatives and friends attend Sunday’s funeral for Liza, a 4-year-old girl killed by the Russian attack on Vinnytsia, Ukraine. The girl was among 23 people killed in Thursday’s missile attack in Vinnytsia. His mother, Iryna Dmytrieva, was among dozens injured.

Efrem Lukatsky/AP

As the week begins, here’s a roundup of the main developments from the past week and a look ahead.

What to watch this week

On Monday, European Union foreign ministers meet in Brussels to discuss continued financial and military support for Ukraine.

Russian President Vladimir Putin must go to Iran tuesday. He is expected to meet Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan as well as Iranian leaders.

A sub-committee hearing of the House Foreign Affairs Committee will focus Wednesday on “responsibility for atrocities committed by Russia in Ukraine”.

what happened last week

11 July : The same day as Russian forces attacked Kharkiv, The second largest city in Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Cheese fries expanded and accelerated Russian citizenship to all Ukrainians.

July 12: The Ukrainian army has reported that it destroyed a Russian ammunition depot in southern Ukraine in a rocket strike. Russia said the massive blast happened when a mineral fertilizer storage facility exploded.

July 13: Officials from Russia, Ukraine, Turkey and the United Nations met in Istanbul to try to reach an agreement to resume Ukrainian grain exports across the Black Sea.

July 14th : Russian missiles hit Vinnytsia, in central Ukraine, killing more than 20 people and injuring more than 100. On the same day, during a meeting at the International Criminal Court in The Hague, 45 countries have pledged to cooperate investigate possible Russian war crimes in Ukraine.

July 15th : A separatist leader announcement the death of British citizen Paul Urey, detained in April by Russian-backed separatists in Ukraine who accused him of being a mercenary. Urey died on July 10, the Donetsk official said. British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss said Urey was “undertaking humanitarian work.”

July 16: Sergei Shoigu, Russian Minister of Defense ordered the Russian army “intensify again the actions of units in all operational areas,” the Ministry of Defense said.

July 17: Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky sacked two senior officialshead of state security and attorney general, alleging collaboration with Russian forces and betrayal of their employees.

In depth

Ukrainian villagers flee Kherson under Russian occupation on foot, by bicycle and in wheelchairs.

Ukraine’s first war rape case is ongoing, but prosecutions are rare.

Members of Brittney Griner’s Russian team defend her character, on and off the pitch.

A Russian strike on a humanitarian center is part of a pattern, according to Ukrainian officials.

How Russia’s current war in Ukraine echoes its Crimean War of the 1850s.

A new reality is reverberating through the Russian music scene.

Russian missiles blast civilians in Ukraine.

Garbage collectors in Kharkiv avoid mortars to collect rubbish.

Special report

Russia’s war in Ukraine is changing the world: see its ripple effects around the globe.

Previous developments

You can read past recaps here. For context and more in-depth stories, you can find more NPR coverage here. Also, listen and subscribe to NPR Ukrainian state podcast for updates throughout the day.

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